Category: Quality Control

The Crow & the Pitcher… Quality Lessons from Aesop

We came across an article from Lifehacker the other day discussing childhood fables and other moral stories that are applicable to adults as well.

One of the stories shared resonated with us.  It’s Aesop’s The Crow & the Pitcher:

The Story: A crow is flying around on an abnormally hot summer day looking for water. He comes across a pitcher of water, but when he tries to stick his beak in he can’t reach the water. He tries and tries, slowly getting more dehydrated. He’s about to give up and accept his fate when he has an idea: he drops small pebbles in the pitcher until the water level rises to the point where he can reach it.

What’s the lesson as applicable to quality? As the article states, “where there’s a will, there’s a way.” Organizations wanting quality shouldn’t give up trying to find solutions and accept the fate of failing to meet customer expectations.  Even if the first idea isn’t dropping pebbles in the pitcher, there are quality tools that can get us to the one that works best.  “Little by little does the trick.”

What the “Blog Boom” means to us… Because quality always matters

ASQ’s Quality Progress July issue discusses the “Blog Bloom” and incorporates feedback from a few of the Influential Voices in the industry.

I’m delighted to say that I’ve been an Influential Voice from the start.  It’s been a truly rewarding experience, and I’m excited to be included in this issue.

In the QP article, I discuss my role as an ASQ Influential Voice blogger and incorporate the PDCA cycle where managing your online presence is concerned.  I’ll actually be discussing this topic in more detail through upcoming webinars and workshops scheduled through HCC’s Institute for Corporate & Continuing Education.

One thing I didn’t discuss is the impact on the industry I believe we have had through this blog. The significance is worth a mention…

Tips on quality from Bentley

We recently discovered a video discussing quality control at a Bentley Mulsanne factory.  As a 3rd party quality assurance and engineering firm, we do a significant amount of work in the automotive industry.  From TS 16949 audits to product inspections, it’s an industry we know places value on quality.

Of course, Bentley is synonymous with quality, representing to many the highest of automotive luxury. For Bentley, “the attention to detail is what defines a valued, quality product.”

“Spec check”

When the cars in this video come off the line, they make sure everything matches the specification.  Non-conformances are flagged and logged.  This can take up to an hour and half.  During another process check, anything flagged is taken care of.

From a previous post:

Inspection Plan Development
A good plan is only as good as its foundation, so a comprehensive and detailed product specification is critical to the success of the overall strategy.  Pro QC often assists clients with this documentation creation and also uses it internally to direct engineers on-site.  A good plan incorporates anything that will affect the salability and performance of the product.

Remembering Philip B. Crosby… “Quality is free”

June 18th would have been Philip B. Crosby’s birthday. He lived through 2001 and is internationally recognized for his ideas on quality management practices.

Crosby was an engineer at heart. As a quality engineer developing the Pershing Missile, he conceptualized the idea of Zero Defects.

Quality is Free likely sits on the bookshelves of many across the world.  Although it was originally published in 1979, it remains relevant and inspiring in today’s global marketplace as well.

Crosby’s response to the quality crisis was the principle of “doing it right the first time” (DIRFT). He also included four major principles:

Social Accountability – SA8000 2008-2014 Comparison

Every five years SAI revises the SA8000 standard in order to ensure its continued relevance and adoptability. This process is conducted in accordance with the ISEAL Code of Good Practice for Setting Social and Environmental Standards (the Code).

Social Accountability International recently discussed this process and offered a side-by-side comparison (2008-2014) for general review.

Aside from general and minor verbiage changes, other observations include:

  • The term “company” and “employer” has been replaced by “organization” in many areas.
  • The Guidance Document is now available for download rather than previously requiring a  “small fee.”
  • An “Introduction” referencing “Management System” and “Intent/Scope” replaces “Purpose and Scope” as the first item listed in the Contents.
  • Night hours are no longer excluded in regards to hiring young workers.